Whenever it rains, snows or you’re running water outside, do you notice water trickling into your basement or first floor? Unfortunately, that’s the sign of poor drainage around your home. The land around the home should be angled to direct any water away from the building. It may not be a distinct angle, but it’s still enough. Over time the ground can erode from the elements, or things can shift, causing any water to flow towards the house. If too much water gets into the house’s foundation, it can cause wood rot or other severe damage that could weaken the structure. Thankfully, there are a few remedies that can redirect water away from the house. Here are some common resolutions to drainage problems.

● Sump Pump: This method is the most effective out of this entire list, but it can also be the most expensive. It’s installed in a well-styled hole at the lowest elevation of your home. When the water reaches a certain height, the sump pump will automatically pump any water out away from the building, so there’s no way to trickle back.

Common Remedies for Your Drainage Problem 1

● French Drains: French drains are the most popular solution. They’re easy to install and work with gravity to drain any water that might cause an issue. It’s useful because a hole is dug at the lowest spot where the water tends to collect. This could be in the yard or basement. The water will be distributed away through this drain.

● Dry Wells: If your property has a severe drainage problem, dry wells are great! They collect a lot of water at once when it’s installed in the lowest part of the ground. Over the next several days, it will distribute the water evenly, so the area isn’t flooded out.

● Curtain Drains: This method uses a drain system that’s covered with a filter cloth. The water is moved out of the yard away from the building where stones and gravel help distribute it.

Landscaped Home

● Higher Yard Elevation: Do you have issues with stagnant water on top of having a drainage issue? The best solution is to have the area elevated so the water can slope down to the drain or just away from the house. While this is usually seen in tandem with the drain, it can be useful on its own if your property has enough space.